When will Intercountry Adoptee Services be provided by Federal Government?

The latest LifeWorks press release from newly established intercountry adoption vendor LifeWorks  (with no prior experience in intercountry adoption support) is frustrating and disappointing to say the least!  Another AU$3.5m on top of the $20+ million spent on establishing the 1800 Hotline for prospective parents!  Not to mention this appears to be a duplication of State provided services already for prospective parents who have been approved and waiting!  Overall by 2019, the Australian government will have spent $33.6m yet to date, not one cent has been spent on providing services for existing adult intercountry adoptees who’s numbers are far greater than the number of children who will possibly enter the country in the next 3 years – taking into consideration the declines in intercountry adoption in Australia and reflected around the world!   Last year only 77 children arrived to Australia via intercountry adoption.

I’ve been involved now in advocating for the rights of adult intercountry adoptees in Australia and worldwide since 1998.  I was granted the only officially allocated “adoptee representative” role out of 15 in the Rudd government’s establishment of the National InterCountry Advisory Group (NICAAG) which began in May 2008 as a result of recommendations from the 2005 Senate Enquiry into Overseas Adoption in Australia under the Howard government.  NICAAG’s role was to consult and advise the Attorney General’s Department on InterCountry Adoption matters.  The other 13 roles were adoptive parents, a couple of them in dual roles of professionals or researchers, and one other adoptee whom WA had wisely included in their two state roles.  At that time, I felt like the token adoptee.  A couple of years later, the group included a another official adoptee role and a 1st/natural/biological mother and other professionals who were not also adoptive parents.

NICAAG Group
Original NICAAG Group Established in 2008

At the time of closure of NICAAG by Tony Abbott in Dec 2013, we had already identified many gaps in service provision and the Australian Government was already working on harmonising services for prospective parents across States/Territories, restricted within the reality of our various State & Territory family laws that underpin adoption.  This $33.6m could have been better spent in providing for the “gaps” that NICAAG had identified.  One of the largest areas was and still is, post adoption support services for existing adult adoptees and adoptive families – especially during teenage and early adult years.  For example, psychological counselling services to train professionals (doctors, psychologists, psychiatrists, social workers, teachers) in understanding the trauma that adoption is based upon and the added complexities intercountry adoption brings; education material for teachers to be provided in schools, and churches, community centres, to help young adopted children grow up in environment’s where their adoption experience is more deeply understood outside their immediate adoptive family; funding for adoptee led groups to better provide what is already given but on a voluntary basis; hugely needed reunification and tracing services; healing retreats for adult intercountry adoptees; DNA testing and a central DNA database that includes the DNA of relinquishing adults; research into the long term outcomes of intercountry adoption, the stages of development where post adoption support is most necessary, and intercountry adoption disruption rates.

Receiving governments continue to promote and push intercountry adoption as “the solution” for many child welfare issues and yet they do so with little research to support their claim that it is a solution focused “on the best interests of the child”.  Perhaps in the short term as a solution to poverty or lack of options of stability for many birth families, intercountry adoption might be seen as the best outcome, but what hasn’t been measured is whether there is a positive emotional, cultural, social, and financial outcome  for the adoptee or the biological family in the long term!

Research conducted in other receiving countries like Sweden have shown that intercountry adoptees suffer at a much greater rate from mental health issues and are far more likely to become recipients of social welfare.  Yet Australia has done little to no research on how we Australian intercountry adoptees fare in the long term and what is not looked at is the long term cost to the country.  By providing children to families via intercountry adoption, the Australian government is not only spending millions to help them achieve their dream, but also it could be costing millions in the long run due to the unresearched outcomes happening in reality.  My point is, if Australia wants to provide children for families then you also have an ethical responsibilty to ensure these children’s outcomes in the long run are as positive as possible.

Last year I spent time gathering together the interested adult intercountry adoptees and lobbying the Australian government under Tony Abbott leadership, who dismantled NICAAG and left the intercountry adoption community with little avenue for community consultation.  Now in the Malcolm Turnbull leadership nothing has changed except to continue on with the push to spend money on the appearance of increasing the number of children bought here .. but despite the amount of money spent so far and the promises of Tony Abbott’s era, not one extra child has yet arrived nor one day taken off any “red tape” process.  So what is all this money being spent for?  Just how logical is this push given the worldwide trend for sending countries to look at better providing for their own and therefore the reduction in available children for intercountry adoption?  Not to mention our own domestic child protection issues need a lot more focus and consultation within the local adoption/permanent care community.  And just who is measuring the outcomes of all these millions spent?

As an adult intercountry adoptee, I have to question the sense in spending all this money when it might otherwise have helped us deal with the issues already here, faced by adoptive families and adult intercountry adoptees on a daily basis.  Or to be more pragmatic and focused on the “interests of the child”, we could have assisted sending countries, like Vietnam, establish the much needed infrastructure to support their own families especially in the special needs/disability area, eliminating the need for intercountry adoption.

The Australian government has been too affected by lobbying efforts of those whose interests are not first and foremost about the children who grow up but about their desire to form a family because of their wealth, power, and privilege in a world full of inequalities.

I ask, when are our Australian politicians and government going to treat us as more than just token adoptees in their consultations and spending?

 

 

 

6 thoughts on “When will Intercountry Adoptee Services be provided by Federal Government?

  1. Reblogged this on The Life Of Von and commented:
    Does it ever end? The struggles of adoptees in one area or another for recognition, validation, rights and respectful treatment – when will we cease to be second class, left out, left behind? Many will perceive this as adult adoptee ‘grizzling’ but put yourself in our shoes.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Yes after so many years on NICAAG and so many trips so Melbourne and Canberra using personal funds, talking, reporting, supporting, negotiating….I am baffled by the amount of money that continues to be spent on ICA in the LEAST effective areas. It is still so hard to understand why government is so resistant to addressing the fundamentals of inter-country adoption. The issues have been clearly laid before them through independent and internal investigations. A counter productive stance has been taken when asked to prioritise and move forward in the area of life long ongoing post adoption support services. Sad eyes, a few shed tears and sympathetic looks are not helpful. There responses with no useful actions to followup, become cheap, hollow, condescending token efforts.

    We adult adoptees are the same age as prospective adoptive parents, we are peers with them. We walk the path of parenthood together. We can no longer be palmed off as the “minor” voices in this arena. Adoptees are NOT 2nd hand Australian Citizens where our needs to be supported by our government are less then Australian prospective parents. So why the disparity in funding and resources? Government can no longer claim ignorance. I have assisted in getting the information they requested and needed to them personally.

    I am sure we could all sit back and say “It could be worse!” and indeed it could be.
    But as my life’s journey has shown me, it can be a lot better too. So as we watch millions of our taxes being poured into duplication of re-branding of existing services, as government smiles and flag waves at the top of the hill, it only serves to magnify the great gapping hole next to them as they dance around it, trying to avoid falling in it or fixing it.

    Like

  3. Pingback: “Adoption services” shouldn’t overlook adoptees! | Kadistan

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