Dove appartengo?

di Charisse Maria Diaz, born as Mary Pike Law, cross cultural adoptee born in Puerto Rico

Pote de leche are Spanish words for “milk bottle”. Where I was born, this is how someone is described when they are too white. Yes, too white. That is what I was called at school when bullied. In my teens, I spent many Sundays sunbathing in the backyard of our home. This was one of the many ways I tried to fit in.

My tendency has been to consider myself a transcultural adoptee and not a transracial adoptee, because my adoptive parents were Caucasian like me. Recently, I realized their looks do not make my experience too different from the experience of any transracial adoptee. I was born in Puerto Rico from an American mother and English father and adopted by a Puerto Rican couple. Puerto Ricans have a mix of Native Taino, European and African genes, our skin colors are as varied as the colors of a rainbow. The most common skin tones go from golden honey to cinnamon. For some, I looked like a little milk-colored ghost.

My adoptive mother told me that an effort was made by the Social Services Department, which oversaw my adoption process, to make the closest match possible. She said the only things that did not “match” with her and my adoptive father were my red hair and my parents’ (actually, my natural father’s) religion. I was supposed to be an Anglican but was going to be raised as a Catholic. This was part of the brief information she gave me about my parents, when she confessed that they were not dead as I had been told at 7 years old. She also admitted that I was not born in Quebec, which they also made me believe. I was born in Ponce, the biggest city on the southern shore of the island. She gave me this information when I was 21 years old.

So, at 21 years of age, I discovered that I was a legitimate Puerto Rican born in the island, and also that my natural father was an English engineer and my natural mother was Canadian. I was happy about the first fact and astonished about the rest. Suddenly, I was half English and half Canadian. At 48 years old I found my original family on my mother’s side. Then I discovered this was a misleading fact about my mother. She was an American who happened to be born in Ontario because my grandfather was working there by that time. I grew up believing I was a Québéquois, after that I spent more than two decades believing that I was half Canadian. All my life I had believed things about myself that were not true.

I learned another extremely important fact about my mother. She was an abstract-expressionist painter, a detail that was hidden by my adoptive family in spite of my obvious artistic talent. I started drawing on walls at 2 years old. My adoptive parents believed that art was to be nothing more than a hobby, it was not a worthy field for an intelligent girl who respected herself and that happened to be their daughter. This did not stop me, anyway. After a bachelor’s degree in Mass Communication and a short career as a copywriter, I became a full-time painter at the age of 30. To discover that my mother was a painter, years later, was mind-blowing.

Identity construction or identity formation is the process in which humans develop a clear and unique view of themselves, of who they are. According to Erik Erikson’s psychosocial stages of development, this process takes place during our teen years, where we explore many aspects of our identities. It concludes at 18 years old, or, as more recent research suggests, in the early twenties. By that age we should have developed a clear vision of the person we are. How was I supposed to reach a conclusion about who I was, when I lacked important information about myself?

My search for my original family started when there was no internet, and it took me more than 20 years to find them. I did not arrive in time to meet my mother. A lifelong smoker, she had died of lung cancer. I connected with my half-siblings, all of them older than me. They were born during her marriage previous to her relationship with my father. Two of them were old enough to remember her pregnancy. They had been enthusiastically waiting for the new baby, just to be told that I was stillborn, news that hurt them so much. Before she passed away, my mother confessed to my siblings that I was relinquished for adoption. Through them, I learned what a difficult choice it was for my mother to let me go.

During my search, well-known discrimination against Latinos in sectors of the American culture gave me an additional motive to fear rejection. I didn’t know I had nothing to worry about. My siblings welcomed me with open arms. Reconnecting with them has been such a heartwarming, comforting, life-changing experience. We are united not only by blood, but also by art, music, literature, and by ideas in common about so many things, including our rejection of racism. It was baffling to learn that my opinions about society and politics are so similar to my natural parents’ points of view, which were different, and sometimes even opposite to my adoptive parents’ beliefs.

My siblings remember my father, their stepfather, fondly. With their help I was able to confirm on the Internet that he had passed away too. His life was a mystery not only to me, but to them too. A few years later, I finally discovered his whereabouts. He lived many years in Australia and was a community broadcasting pioneer. A classical music lover, he helped to establish Sydney-based radio station 2MBS-FM and worked to promote the growth of the public broadcasting sector. His contributions granted him the distinction of being appointed OBE by the British government. My mind was blown away for a second time when I learned that he had dedicated his life to a field related to mass communication, which was my career of choice before painting. My eldest half-brother on his side was the first relative I was able to contact. “Quite a surprise!”, he wrote the day he found out that he had a new sister. Huge surprise, indeed. My father never told anyone about my existence. Now I got to know my half-siblings and other family members on his side too. They are a big family, and I am delighted to keep in touch with them.

My early childhood photo

With each new piece of information about my parents and my heritage, adjustments had to be made to the concept of who I am. To be an international, transcultural, transracial adoptee can be terribly disorienting. We grow up wondering not only about our original families, but also about our cultural roots. We grow up feeling we are different from everyone around us, in so many subtle and not so subtle ways… In my case, feeling I am Puerto Rican, but not completely Puerto Rican. Because I may consider myself a true Boricua (the Taino demonym after the original name of the island, Borikén), but in tourist areas people address me in English, and some are astonished to hear me answer in Spanish. More recently, I have pondered if my reserved nature, my formal demeanor, my cool reactions may be inherited English traits. And getting to know about my parents, even some of my tastes, like what I like to eat and the music I love, has made more sense. But in cultural terms I am not American or British enough to be able to wholly consider myself any of these. Where do I belong, then? And how can I achieve completion of my identity under these conditions? It is a natural human need to belong. Many times I have felt rootless. In limbo.

A great number of international adoptees have been adopted into Anglo-Saxon countries, mostly United States and Australia, and many of them come from places considered developing countries. The international adoptee community, which has found in social media a great tool to communicate, receive and give support, and get organized, encourages transracial and transcultural adoptees to connect with their roots. My case is a rare one, because it is the opposite of the majority. I was adopted from the Anglo-Saxon culture to a Latin American culture. I never imagined that this would put me in a delicate position.

Puerto Rico has a 500-year-old Hispanic culture. I am in love with the Spanish language, with its richness and infinite subtleties. I feel so honored and grateful to have this as my first language. We study the English language starting at first grade of elementary school, because we are a United States’ territory since 1898, as a result of the Spanish-American war. We are United States citizens since 1914. We have an independentist sector and an autonomist sector which are very protective of our culture. Historically, there has been a generalized resistance to learning English. In my case, I seem to have some ability with languages and made a conscious effort to achieve fluency, for practical reasons but also because it is the language of my parents and my ancestors.

In 2019 I traveled to Connecticut to meet my eldest half-brother on my mother’s side. That year, a close friend who knew about my reunion with natural family told me that someone in our circle had criticized the frequency of my social media posts in the English language. Now that I am in touch with my family, I have been posting more content in English, and it seems this makes some people uncomfortable. But the most surprising part is that even a member of my natural family has told me that I am a real Boricua and should be proud of it. I was astonished. Who says I am not proud? I have no doubt that this person had good intentions, but no one can do this for me. Who or what I am is for me to decide. But the point is some people seem to believe that connecting with my Anglo-Saxon roots implies a rejection of Puerto Rican culture or that I consider being Puerto Rican an inferior condition, something not far from racism. Nothing could be farther from the truth! I was born in Puerto Rico and love my culture.

Puerto Rico’s situation is complicated, in consequence my identity issues became complicated. I am aware of our island’s subordinated position to a Caucasian English-speaking country; that this circumstance has caused injustices against our people; that our uniqueness needs to be protected and celebrated. Being aware sometimes makes our lives more difficult, because we understand the deep implications of situations. There was a time when I felt torn by the awareness of my reality: being Puerto Rican and also being linked by my ancestry to two cultures which for centuries dedicated their efforts to Imperialism. I am even related through my father to Admiral Horatio Nelson, a historical character that embodies British imperialism. How to reconcile that to my island’s colonial history and situation? Where I was going to put my loyalty? To feel that I was being judged for reconnecting to my original cultures – something every international adoptee is encouraged to do – did not help me in the task of answering these difficult questions.

Even when they were not perfect and made mistakes, my natural parents were good people with qualities I admire. The more I get to know them, the more I love them. The more I know them, the more I see them in me. If I love them, I cannot reject where they came from, which is also a basic part of who I am. Therefore, I have concluded that I cannot exclude their cultures from my identity construction process.

To connect to these cultures until I feel they are also mine is a process. I am not sure if I will ever achieve this, but I am determined to go through this process without any feelings of guilt. To do so is a duty to myself, to be able to become whole and have a real, or at least a better sense of who I am. And it is not only a duty, it is also my right.

Essere veramente visto come un adottato filippino

di Arlynn Hope Dunn, adottato dalle Filippine negli USA; presentato al 16a consultazione globale filippina sui servizi di assistenza all'infanzia il 24 settembre 2021.

Mabuhay e buongiorno! Mi chiamo Hope e mi unisco a te da Knoxville, Tennessee, nel sud-est degli Stati Uniti. Ringrazio ICAB per avermi invitato a far parte della Consultazione Globale sull'adozione internazionale. Sono grato di accedere alle risorse post-adozione dell'ICAB, che sono state significative nel mio processo di riconnessione con la mia famiglia d'origine. Sottolineo che la mia storia e la mia riflessione oggi sono mie e non parlo per le esperienze vissute di altri adottati. Spero che tutti coloro che ascoltano le nostre testimonianze oggi siano aperti a varie prospettive sull'adozione poiché ci influenzano nel corso della nostra vita.

I miei inizi

Sono nata a Manila nel dicembre 1983 e nel luglio 1984 sono volata dalle Filippine con la mia assistente sociale, per incontrare i miei genitori adottivi e la sorella di sei anni che è stata adottata dalla Corea. Avevamo una vita suburbana idilliaca e tranquilla, mia madre era una casalinga e mio padre era un geologo, che viaggiava spesso per il paese. La nostra famiglia molto probabilmente si sarebbe trasferita a ovest per ospitare il lavoro di mio padre, ma non abbiamo mai lasciato il Tennessee. Mio padre aveva il diabete giovanile e sviluppò la polmonite e morì tre giorni prima del mio primo compleanno. Mia madre, una sopravvissuta alla poliomielite, che l'ha lasciata senza l'uso del braccio destro, è diventata improvvisamente una madre single di due bambini piccoli senza parenti vicini. Il dolore irrisolto per la perdita di mio padre si è riverberato per anni nella nostra famiglia attraverso il ritiro emotivo di mia sorella, che era molto vicina a nostro padre... e mia sorella. Quanto a me, ho oscillato dal ruolo di comico per assorbire le tensioni tra mia sorella e mia madre all'autoregolazione delle mie emozioni accumulando cibo da bambino e imbottigliando le mie emozioni, per rendermi scarso e piccolo. Mentre sono cresciuto in una casa che ha verbalizzato l'amore, ora riconosco i modelli di abbandono e codipendenza che hanno avuto un impatto sul mio sviluppo. Sono anche cresciuto nell'era dei primi anni '90, dove le norme sociali e i media rafforzavano il daltonismo piuttosto che offrire la razza come un'opportunità per discutere e celebrare la diversità culturale unica. 

A differenza delle grandi comunità filippine in California, c'era poca diversità dove sono cresciuto, poiché la maggior parte della mia scuola e comunità era bianca con alcuni studenti neri. Ero uno dei tre studenti asiatici e siamo stati tutti adottati. Piuttosto che gravitare l'uno verso l'altro, ci siamo appoggiati a diversi gruppi di amici come parte naturale dell'assimilazione. Di noi tre, ero più tranquillo e dolorosamente timido, il che mi rendeva un facile bersaglio di bullismo. All'età di sette anni, sono stato chiamato la parola "N" sullo scuolabus. Mi è stato detto che mia madre mi ha partorito in una risaia. Ironia della sorte, al ritorno dell'anno scolastico in autunno, le ragazze si accalcavano per toccarmi la pelle e chiedermi come facevo a diventare così scuro. A quei tempi, ero così orgoglioso della mia pelle scura e non ho mai imparato a conoscere il colorismo fino a quando non ero un adulto. Alla fine il bullismo è diminuito fino a dopo l'attacco alle torri gemelle dell'11 settembre 2001, quando il razzismo è riapparso e un altro studente mi ha detto di farmi saltare in aria con il resto della mia gente. In risposta, la mia insegnante mi ha fatto abbracciare l'altro studente perché a 17 anni “era solo un ragazzo”. La risposta della mia famiglia è stata di ricordarmi che sono americano come se solo quella fosse una corazza sufficiente per resistere e deviare la violenza verbale. Ho interiorizzato così tanta vergogna di essere diverso, che ho equiparato a meno di, che sono diventato complice della mia stessa cancellazione culturale e del crollo dell'autostima.

Giovani adulti

Da giovane adulto, ho lottato con le pietre miliari che venivano naturalmente ai miei coetanei. Ho fallito la maggior parte delle lezioni al liceo, ma al mio preside piacevo e mi ha permesso di laurearmi in tempo. Ho lasciato il college senza una visione di chi volevo essere entro i 21 anni. Ho concluso una relazione e un fidanzamento di sei anni e non sono riuscito a mantenere un lavoro entro i 23. Ero attivo nella chiesa evangelica ma gli anziani mi hanno detto che il mio la depressione e l'idea suicidaria derivavano dalla mia mancanza di fede. Alla fine, ho acquisito esperienza lavorando con i bambini. Sono tornato al college all'età di 27 anni mentre svolgevo più lavori e sono stato accettato nel programma di assistente di terapia occupazionale, dove ho acquisito strumenti per la salute mentale e in seguito mi sono laureato con lode e ho pronunciato il discorso di laurea.

Come sfogo dal mio intenso programma universitario e lavorativo, mi piaceva andare al cinema da solo e nel 2016 ho visto un film che è stato il catalizzatore per il mio viaggio alla ricerca della mia eredità.  Leone è un film sulla vita reale di Saroo Brierly, cresciuto dai suoi genitori adottivi australiani e alla fine si è riunito con la sua prima madre in India. Mentre Saroo è raccolto tra le braccia della sua prima madre, una diga di emozioni si è spezzata dentro di me, principalmente il senso di colpa per il fatto che in qualche modo avevo smarrito il ricordo della mia prima madre. Qualcosa di profondo dentro di me, risvegliato mentre assistevo a questo tiro alla fune sulle sue emozioni, recitato su uno schermo cinematografico. Ho visto uno specchio che mi illuminava mentre correva interferenza tra due mondi che raramente lo vedevano e le complessità dell'adozione e come è stato lasciato a conciliare questo peso insopportabile da solo.

Rivendicare il mio patrimonio filippino

Ho iniziato il mio viaggio per reclamare la mia eredità filippina attraverso il mio nome. Negli ultimi quattro anni, sono passato dal mio nome adottivo Hope al mio nome di nascita Arlynn, che in gaelico significa "giuramento, impegno". Mi sembra di poter tornare a qualcosa che ora so per certo mi è stato dato dalla mia prima madre. Prima di iniziare formalmente la mia ricerca nella mia storia, l'ho detto a mia sorella, che ha sostenuto la mia decisione. Passarono diversi mesi prima che chiesi a mia madre se conosceva altri dettagli sulla mia famiglia d'origine oltre alla corrispondenza che mi aveva dato in un raccoglitore. Sentivo di dover proteggere i suoi sentimenti come se il fatto di voler sapere improvvisamente della mia prima famiglia l'avrebbe ferita. Mi ha detto che non c'erano altre informazioni. Più tardi, avrei scoperto che era una bugia.

Per tutta la vita, mia madre ha continuato a lottare con il suo uso improprio dei farmaci antidolorifici prescritti. Da bambina, ricordo che mia madre mi faceva notare quali flaconi di medicinali usava nel caso non si fosse svegliata per farmi chiamare la polizia. A volte, dormivo sul pavimento vicino alla sua stanza per assicurarmi che respirasse ancora. Avevo 32 anni quando ha richiesto l'intervento ospedaliero per i sintomi di astinenza, mi ha detto nella sua rabbia che avrebbe voluto lasciarmi nel mio paese di nascita. Mi ha fatto più male che se mi avesse schiaffeggiato perché non si è mai scagliata contro la mia adozione quando ero più giovane. Sono uscito dalla sua stanza sentendomi come se avessi perso un altro genitore.

Alla fine, la casa della mia infanzia è stata venduta e mia madre è andata in una casa di cura per cure a seguito di un'emorragia cerebrale. Mia sorella ed io abbiamo recuperato la cassetta di sicurezza di nostra madre presso la sua banca locale, che a mia insaputa conteneva il mio caso di studio completo. Mia sorella mi ha detto che non avrei mai dovuto saperlo e nostra madre le ha fatto promettere di non dirmelo, quando era più piccola. Mi sono seduto da solo nella mia macchina singhiozzando mentre leggevo il nome del mio primo padre per la prima volta poiché non era elencato sul mio certificato di nascita, al quale ho sempre avuto accesso crescendo. Descriveva in dettaglio come i miei genitori avessero sette figli e cinque di loro morirono durante l'infanzia per malattia. I miei genitori si separarono mentre mio padre rimase con i figli sopravvissuti e mia madre rimase con suo nipote rifiutandosi di riconciliarsi con mio padre non sapendo che era incinta di me. Nel corso del tempo, mia madre ha cominciato a vagare lontano da casa ed è stata istituzionalizzata. Dopo la mia nascita si è allontanata di nuovo da casa e ha scoperto che cantava da sola. Dopo la mia nascita, mi è stato consigliato di essere collocato in un rifugio per bambini temporaneo poiché mia madre non era in grado di prendersi cura di me. Un'impronta viola del pollice al posto di una firma ha indirizzato il suo atto di resa per me alle autorità di assistenza sociale.

Famiglia perduta da tempo

Alla ricerca della famiglia biologica

Grazie alle risorse di ICAB e Facebook, sono stato in grado di localizzare mio fratello e mia sorella sopravvissuti e ho appreso che i miei genitori naturali sono morti. All'inizio del 2021, sono riuscito a trovare i parenti della mia prima madre, inclusa la sua unica sorella sopravvissuta. Sono ancora stupito e grato che i miei fratelli e la mia famiglia allargata mi abbiano abbracciato e io soffro dal desiderio di incontrarli, di essere toccato dalla mia gente. Prima della pandemia avevo l'obiettivo di viaggiare nelle Filippine, ma durante la chiusura dell'economia ho perso due dei miei lavori, la mia salute mentale ha sofferto dell'isolamento di vivere da solo durante il blocco e alla fine ho perso la mia casa e i soldi che è stato cresciuto da amici e famiglia per andare nelle Filippine ha dovuto impedirmi di vivere nella mia macchina, finché non fossi riuscito a stare con gli amici. Dallo scorso novembre ho potuto ottenere un lavoro a tempo pieno e quest'estate ho trovato una terapista, anche lei adottata transrazziale, che ha lavorato con me per elaborare il mio dolore e il senso di colpa del sopravvissuto. sopravvisse a molti dei miei fratelli. Mentre ricostruisco lentamente la mia vita, una rinnovata energia per tornare un giorno nella mia patria per incontrare i miei fratelli mi motiva ulteriormente.

Mentre la mia ricerca per reclamare la mia patria, la mia lingua perduta e i miei fratelli ha portato un profondo dolore, c'è stata un'enorme gioia nel connettermi con le mie nipoti che mi stanno insegnando le frasi Waray Waray e Tagalog. Ho curato i miei social media in modo che gli algoritmi mi attirino verso altri adottati, artisti, scrittori e guaritori filippini. Lo scorso dicembre ho compiuto 37 anni, la stessa età di quando mi ha partorito la mia prima madre. Il giorno del mio compleanno ho potuto incontrare un prete di Baybaylan che ha pregato su di me e sui miei antenati. Durante tutto questo tempo da quando l'ho riscoperta per caso di studio, ho cercato di affrontare il dolore e alla fine ha iniziato a piangere. Abbiamo pianto insieme e quel piccolo gesto gentile mi ha toccato così profondamente perché per la prima volta ho sentito come se qualcuno fosse seduto con me nel mio dolore, ed era così intimo perché Mi sono sentito veramente visto in quel momento e degno di amore. 

Pensieri per i professionisti dell'adozione

Le pratiche del settore delle adozioni sono cambiate drasticamente nel corso degli anni da quando sono stato adottato. Spero che le conversazioni sull'adozione continuino a spostarsi verso gli adottati per includere le nostre storie che illuminino questo ampio continuum di esperienze vissute che indicano non solo le esperienze positive o negative, ma le tengono tutte sotto una lente critica da parte dei professionisti dell'adozione. Spero che i professionisti di questo settore riconoscano e riconoscano il grado in cui il trauma della separazione precoce dei bambini dalle nostre prime madri e il ruolo dell'assimilazione e la perdita dell'associazione culturale influiscono sugli adottati. I futuri genitori sono formati in questo e anche nella consulenza sul lutto? Considera di guardare verso pratiche che assicurino la conservazione della famiglia, se possibile. Se viene concessa l'adozione, come farai a garantire che un bambino abbia le risorse per trovare una comunità se vive in luoghi non culturalmente diversi? Come troveranno la comunità? Un'ultima domanda di riflessione: quando un bambino viene abbandonato dal tuo paese, quali pratiche saranno assicurate per sostenere quell'adottato che vuole tornare nel paese di origine, senza che quella persona si senta un estraneo, un turista o un intruso?

Ho un breve video di un collage di foto che ho creato che attraversa la mia vita da quando ero bambino fino ad oggi.

Grazie mille per aver ascoltato la mia testimonianza.

Maraming Salamat po.

Musica ispirata alle mie origini boliviane di adozione

di Jo R. Helsper adottato dalla Bolivia alla Germania.

Ispirazione per la mia musica

Sono interessato alla musica dal giorno in cui sono stato adottato in Germania. Mi piace dire che sono nato con la musica nel sangue . Ho iniziato a suonare strumenti di musica classica e ho provato molti altri strumenti, come pianoforte, clarinetto, chitarra e così via.

Durante la mia infanzia, abbiamo avuto un incontro semestrale organizzato dai nostri genitori adottivi tedeschi, dove noi adottati boliviani potevamo incontrarci, conoscere le nostre stesse radici e anche così i genitori potevano parlare dei temi dell'adozione. Quando avevo circa 6 o 7 anni, i nostri genitori hanno invitato un gruppo musicale boliviano per il nostro incontro. Quella è stata la prima volta che ho sentito la musica popolare boliviana in concerto. Prima di questo, l'avevo ascoltato solo tramite MC o CD, quindi ero assolutamente affascinato dal canto e dal suonare gli strumenti culturali e quello è stato il momento in cui ho deciso di suonare anche gli strumenti.

Sono assolutamente felice di essere stato adottato in Germania, ma imparare i miei strumenti nativi mi ha fatto sentire come se avessi un legame con la mia terra, da dove vengo, anche se non l'avevo mai vista prima. Così ho continuato a suonare, scrivere e cantare le canzoni della Bolivia.

Quando sono cresciuto ho imparato anche lo spagnolo. Capire il significato delle canzoni era importante anche per me perché cantare da solo non bastava. Volevo anche sapere cosa significavano le canzoni.

La mia ispirazione nella mia musica è il legame con la mia terra in cui sono nato e l'affascinante cultura degli indiani boliviani e delle montagne.

Non ho ancora visitato la Bolivia. Spero che un giorno andrò a visitare il mio vecchio orfanotrofio e la città dove sono nato. Quando suono, è come se fossi più vicino alla Bolivia e posso immaginare come inizia il tramonto sulle montagne e come il vento soffia sui campi. È anche un buon metodo per rilassarsi e dimenticare lo stress a volte.

Ascolta la musica della Bolivia di Jo:

Italiano
%%piè di pagina%%